Sculpture

Guy J. Bellaver

Gallery and Exhibition Schedule, 2017

March, 2017

Guy J. Bellaver’s work has been chosen for the following Galleries and Exhibitions:
1. St Charles Arts Council’s Pop-Up Gallery at Pheasant Run Resort.
The Opening Reception is Friday, April 28 from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m., hosted by PRR.
There will be two Gallery Spaces – both of which are in the Bourbon Street area of the Resort

2. Chicago Sculpture Exhibit – The Year of Public Art in Chicago
This fantastic celebration of Public Art will include over 50 sculptures all over the city.  Guy’s piece Calligraphy was accepted this year.
CSE is a year-long exhibition, opening in May.  The kick-off party is on June 23rd.  More on that coming soon.

3.  Sculpture Walk Sioux Falls
SculptureWalk Sioux Falls (South Dakota) is one of the finest shows of its kind.  Over 50 pieces of large-scale sculpture are sited all over the city.  They have also partnered with local universities and businesses to site sculptures all over the city – both indoors and outdoors.  If you love sculpture, you should go to this show.

4.  Sculpture on the Prairie
The Fine Line Creative Arts Center’s Inaugural Sculpture Exhibition opens in May.  The Opening Reception is May 19 from 6 to 8 p.m.
In addition to the outdoor exhibit, Fine Line also has a juried sculpture show in their Kavanagh Gallery, running from May 19 to June 30.

The Year of Color – Sculpture Exhibitions

July, 2016


More Information:
Peoria – sculpturewalkpeoria.org | facebook.com/sculptpeoria |
http://www.pjstar.com/news/20160522/sculpture-walk-2016-brings-15-new-pieces-to-peorias-warehouse-district

Chicago – chicagosculptureexhibit.org | https://www.facebook.com/ChicagoSculptureExhibit | dnainfo.com/chicago/20160623/jefferson-park/wavy-sculpture-inspired-by-particle-physics-installed-jeff-park

St. Charles – stcparks.org/Sculpture/exhibit-2016.html | http://www.kcchronicle.com/lists/2016/06/17/813d71e240844fafb1fbb2f43784a143/72f518d7-a530-4966-81a2-007fb4c860cb/image-pv_web.jpg

https://www.facebook.com/guy.bellaver.9

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver Elected to the Fox Valley Arts Hall of Fame

March, 2016

Bellaver was chosen for this honor because of his general body of work, the extent of the siting and scale of his sculptures, and the time that he gives “volunteering, promoting, and educating students in the arts”.  Also noted by the Recognition Committee were Bellaver’s many Fox Valley area public art projects.  In his 35 years in St. Charles, he has sited a significant body of work in the area, including iconic sculptures such as Ēkwabet, the Kane County Veterans Memorial and reflections.

For more information about the FVAHF go to their web site – foxvalleyarts.org.

Chicago and Local media coverage:

http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20160204/news/160209363/

http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/aurora-beacon-news/news/ct-abn-fox-valley-arts-st-0208-20160205-story.html

http://www.kcchronicle.com/2016/02/04/fox-valley-arts-hall-of-fame-announces-2016-inductees/actmeed/

reflections Sculpture Sited and Dedicated at Volunteer Plaza in St. Charles, IL

August, 2015

Guy J. Bellaver’s commemorative sculpture entitled reflections, has been installed and dedicated in the newly created Volunteer Plaza, along the Riverwalk in St. Charles, Illinois.  The sculpture was commissioned by a community group to honor volunteerism, as exemplified by Max and Doris Hunt.

Images of the sculpture and information about the project may be seen on the project web site – https://reflectionsatvolunteerplaza.wordpress.com/

Dr. C. Alfred Patten, Project Creator and Manager explained the reflections public art project. “This project began as a way to honor Max and Doris Hunt – longtime residents and tireless supporters and contributors to our community. We chose to bestow that honor with public art – a sculpture designed by Guy Bellaver to meet the Hunt family’s vision of a piece that wasn’t a statue of their parents, but rather a work of art that captured their spirit. Over time our committee realized that Max and Doris were, in essence, exemplars of volunteerism – the engine that drives the best of communities. And the result of many discussions about this commemorative idea with the River Corridor Foundation, the Arts Council, and the City, is Volunteer Plaza.”

Bellaver explains the sculpture’s design and name, “I first met Max and Doris Hunt when we moved to St. Charles in 1985. Max was the co-chair of the Ēkwabet project, and he and Doris were involved in so many things, and they always encouraged those around them to contribute and participate – to see themselves with the community as their backdrop. For this memorial, I decided that I wanted to create another piece in my Quarks Series – sculptures that are all about energy. But I wanted this work to be made from highly polished stainless steel to allow community members to look at the sculpture and see themselves reflected within the city.”

reflections is the 17th sculpture in Bellaver’s Quarks series, which translates the physics of high energy collisions into art.  The sculpture is made of polished stainless steel, standing 12′ tall.  reflections is an interpretation of energy, which comes from volunteers who energize their community – people like Max and Doris Hunt, whom the sculpture honors.  The highly polished and reflective stainless steel sculpture speaks to the Hunt’s character as people who always encouraged those around them to contribute and participate – to see themselves with the community as their backdrop.

Dr. C. Alfred Patten, project organizer, welcomed nearly 200 guests to the dedication by telling them how he felt upon seeing the sculpture being installed.  “On Tuesday, August 4th, I stopped at this location on my way to the train station.  The boom of a powerful crane towered high above, and an excited artist gave me a fist bump.  Everything centered around a metal crate containing highly polished stainless steel.  I returned to the location about 3:00 p.m.  As I approached the art piece, a chill went up and down my spine.  I was impressed by its beauty and how it projected the feeling of energy.  Tears came to my eyes as I realized that a five year journey was over… but a journey I would gladly take again in a heartbeat.”

In his Dedication remarks, Bellaver said, “Volunteer Plaza is the perfect place to display the names of people who have given many hours of their time and talents in making their community a better place. As I read the names on these pavers I think that I learned about some of these people when I moved with my family to the St. Charles area; some of them I have known personally; and most of the recent recipients of the Charlemagne Award are still volunteering.  And I would like to thank them and their families for their continuing involvement. “

Holly Cabel, Director of the St. Charles Park District, President of the River Corridor Foundation and Board Member of the Arts Council, spoke at the dedication on the subject of “The Plaza as a Celebration of Volunteerism”.  She pointed out the plaza pavers inscribed with the names of the Charlemagne Award winners.  Cabel said, “The plaza, though, cannot physically display the names of even a small percentage of all volunteers.  It is important however that all volunteers have the opportunity to be recognized. To this end, it is planned to develop a digital data base with instructions for access posted in the plaza where volunteer information can be stored and accessed.”  She concluded her remarks by saying, “Most importantly, volunteerism has made St. Charles not just a place to live, but a place to belong.”

Patten officially gifted reflections to the city with the words, “Now comes the time that I’ve been waiting for for five years. I get to turn this over to the City of St. Charles via it’s Mayor, Ray Rogina.” Mayor Rogina first accepted the committee’s gift of the sculpture, as well as Dr. Patten’s gift of liquid Tide and sponges as a donation to the city’s maintenance program for reflections. Rogina commented that “volunteerism, education, and Max and Doris Hunt go hand in hand”.

Doris Hunt then spoke about the sculpture and how much it means to her and her family.  Between the wind, a temperamental microphone and a soft voice, it was difficult to hear all of her heartfelt thank yous.  But she concluded her remarks with a very moving and elegant gesture – reaching out her hand and asking everyone in attendance to do the same – asking them to understand that they had it within their power to help those around them in need.  This simple gesture made it easy for all those attending the dedication to understand why this sculpture was dedicated to Doris and Max Hunt.

Patten ended the program with a powerful quote from Winston Churchill, “We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give.

1970 – See a Video of the Project from Design to Dedication

Sculpture Dedicated at W & J College

October, 2014

Guy J. Bellaver’s sculpture, entitled 1970, has been installed and dedicated at Washington & Jefferson College in Washington, Pennsylvania.  The sculpture was chosen in the college’s 1970 Commemorative Public Art Competition, a “work of art commissioned to celebrate the myriad changes that occurred during the 1970 academic year.”

1970 – the winning submission in the competition – is the 2nd sculpture in Bellaver’s “…in Motion” series. The works in this series are stainless steel kinetic sculptures featuring inserts of materials such as colored glass and painted metal.  The Public Art committee that awarded the commission to Bellaver was particularly interested in the fact that the sculpture was kinetic. The piece was designed, when turned, to form many other views, representative of the changes so much a part of the first co-ed class at W & J, as well as the era of the ‘70s. The committee felt that it was a perfect representation of that time, and the “tag line” on the dedication plaque reads – Change is Motion, Motion is Change.

Louise Kirkpatrick Ross and Betsey Hurwitz-Schwab, members of the Public Art Committee and the first co-ed class, W & J Trustees, and the principal organizer/fundraiser and committee chair, respectively, of the 1970 project, introduced the sculpture and the people involved in the project in the Dedication Program. The Program explains the project. “’1970’ is viewed by some as the beginning of the modern history of Washington & Jefferson College…For the first time in its history, women were admitted to the College, the youngest president was inaugurated…a charter was issued for the first Black Student Union…art was declared a major.  These are only a few of the sweeping changes that took place that academic year.  The sculpture 1970 is the first of its kind on the campus and is dedicated to that time when [W & J] moved forward and maintained its status among some of the best liberal arts college in the modern era.”

In his Dedication remarks, Bellaver was asked by the committee to discuss his Artist Statement, the different liberal arts disciplines that came into play during the creation [and execution] of the project, and the tremendous significance of public art on college campuses.  In addressing that request, he said, “A Liberal Arts education teaches us about the world and – as importantly – teaches us how to learn and think creatively.  By adding public art to this beautiful campus, W & J is making a statement about the importance of creativity.  This kinetic sculpture was designed for anyone to touch and move.  It can be viewed differently, from different sides and different perspectives.  A Liberal Arts education teaches us to value everyone’s perspective.”

The program’s ending remarks spoke again to the theme of change.  Said Ross, “And suddenly W & J is a different college.  We find ourselves taking a second glance at the school we thought would never change.  But it has changed and will continue to do so.  W & J is an institution in flux.  To the new President, to the co-eds, and to those who are bringing about these changes the 1971 Pandora [school yearbook] is dedicated.”

After the ceremony, Hurwitz-Schwab said about 1970, “The piece far exceeded my expectations and I couldn’t be more pleased with how it turned out and how it looks.”

W & J’s Public Art Committee:  Betsey Hurwitz-Schwab, Louise Ross, Susan Kepler, Patricia Maloney, Paul Scoles, Ruth Riesenman, Barbara Walls

Sculpture/Guy J. Bellaver Announces 2014 Exhibition Schedule

June, 2014

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver has been chosen to participate in four sculpture exhibitions this summer. His schedule includes:

Oak Park Sculpture Walk –  Lake St. and Oak Park Ave., Oak Park, IL – June 1 thru September 21 – Prairie Song.Q
Art Gathering: Sculptors Connect Exhibition – Governor’s State University – June 16 thru August 18 – Double Edge
Monona Terrace [Inaugural] Sculpture Exhibition – Monona Terrace Community and Convention Center, Madison, WI – Summer, 2014 – Quarks VI and Quarks VII
Shirley & George Wiemer Sculpture Exhibition – University of Mt. Union, Alliance, OH – Through June, 2015 – Oriental

In discussing Oak Park’s Sculpture Walk, Bellaver explains, “One of my pieces was selected for Oak Park’s inaugural Sculpture Walk (2012) – but it fell off a bobcat while I was loading it, and I was unable to salvage it.  I submitted an entry again this year, and am delighted to have Prairie Song.Q accepted and sited in such a great spot [at the corner of Oak Park Avenue and Lake Street, at the entrance to Scoville Park]. I am also very pleased to have Double Edge accepted for the “Art Gathering” exhibition series in the Visual Art Gallery at Governor’s State University. I’m looking forward to seeing the show, and also to touring the fantastic Nathan Manilow Sculpture Park.”

David Wells. owner of DW Creative Services, is curating the inaugural Monona Terrace Sculpture Exhibition.  He chose Quarks VI and VII because, “The rooftop is very active with a cafe, concerts, dances, weddings, exercise classes, et. during the season as it has wonderful direct views of the state capitol and Lake Monona.  The sculptures would be viewed by well over a hundred thousand people over the course of the year. And we want pieces that will stand out in the terrace space.”

Robert Buganski, Chairman and Associate Professor of Art at the University of Mount Union in Alliance, Ohio explains the Wiemer Exhibition, “There are 10 sculptors selected…to submit one or two completed and ready to install sculptures for our Wiemer Exhibition. These sculptures are then voted on by the entire campus community and the two sculptures with the most votes are exhibited. We need excellent quality outdoor sculpture and I have seen and admired [Bellaver’s] sculpture on “The International Sculpture Center” website and believe that any of his work would contribute greatly to this program.” Bellaver says, “I was honored that Mr. Buganski and the University of Mount Union community selected Oriental for the Shirley & George Wiemer Exhibition. It’s sited in a great spot on a beautiful campus.”

Sculpture/Guy J. Bellaver Wins Sculpture Competition From Washington & Jefferson College

January, 2014

Concept drawing for 1970

Guy J. Bellaver has won Washington & Jefferson College’s recent Public Art 1970 Commemorative Public Art Competition. W&J’s Call to Artists explained the competition’s intent – “This work of art is commissioned to celebrate the myriad changes that occurred during the 1970 academic year.  These changes include, but are not limited to the beginning of co-education, the inauguration of a new college president, the change from the traditional 2 semester academic calendar to an innovative 4-1-4 program, and the first art major declaration.” The title of Bellaver’s winning sculpture design is 1970, a piece from his “…in Motion” series.  The works in this series are stainless steel kinetic sculptures featuring inserts of materials such as colored glass.

Said Bellaver, “It is an honor to create a sculpture that commemorates all of the many individual accomplishments and changes of the era that are so important to Washington & Jefferson College and its growth and evolution.  The ‘70s were also a time of major accomplishments and changes for me, so this piece is strongly rooted in my background and experiences.”

Betsey Hurwitz-Schwab, Chair of the Commemorative Public Arts Committee and W&J graduate said, “Mr. Bellaver’s 1970 design was the unanimous choice of the committee.  We loved the original concept, and the more I see [of the detailed drawings and maquettes that he has produced], the more excited I become!”

Louise Kirkpatrick Ross, committee member and another W&J graduate, adds “We are all so excited and looking forward to working with Mr. Bellaver on this project.”

The sculpture will be completed and sited in time for a dedication at the College’s October, 2014 Homecoming Celebration.

Artist Statement for 1970:

I became an artist in the 1970s, and this sculpture is evocative of that time in many of its elements.

The stainless steel rods are welded together to form nine hendecagons, with an overall height and width of nearly 12 feet.  This 11-sided shape represents W&J’s position as the 11th oldest college in the nation.  Each of the interior eight “levels” of the stainless steel rod can be turned to form many other views, representing the changes so much a part of the era of the’70s.

The colorful spiral shapes within the hendecagon “grow” as the sculpture widens, representing the growth of the college. These brightly colored segments also represent an era when color was becoming dominant in art, architecture, design, etc.  Tie dye, color saturation, vibrancy…

The juxtaposition of the colors and the stainless steel suggest the combining of masculine and feminine elements to celebrate the beginning of co-education at Washington & Jefferson.

More information about Sculpture/Guy J. Bellaver and Washington & Jefferson College may be found on their web sites – http://bellaverstudios.com/ and http://washjeff.edu.

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver Receives Sculpture Commission From St. Vincent College

January, 2013

Guy J. Bellaver has won Washington & Jefferson College’s recent Public Art 1970 Commemorative Public Art Competition. W&J’s Call to Artists explained the competition’s intent – “This work of art is commissioned to celebrate the myriad changes that occurred during the 1970 academic year.  These changes include, but are not limited to the beginning of co-education, the inauguration of a new college president, the change from the traditional 2 semester academic calendar to an innovative 4-1-4 program, and the first art major declaration.” The title of Bellaver’s winning sculpture design is 1970, a piece from his “…in Motion” series.  The works in this series are stainless steel kinetic sculptures featuring inserts of materials such as colored glass.

Said Bellaver, “It is an honor to create a sculpture that commemorates all of the many individual accomplishments and changes of the era that are so important to Washington & Jefferson College and its growth and evolution.  The ‘70s were also a time of major accomplishments and changes for me, so this piece is strongly rooted in my background and experiences.”

Betsey Hurwitz-Schwab, Chair of the Commemorative Public Arts Committee and W&J graduate said, “Mr. Bellaver’s 1970 design was the unanimous choice of the committee.  We loved the original concept, and the more I see [of the detailed drawings and maquettes that he has produced], the more excited I become!”

Louise Kirkpatrick Ross, committee member and another W&J graduate, adds “We are all so excited and looking forward to working with Mr. Bellaver on this project.”

The sculpture will be completed and sited in time for a dedication at the College’s October, 2014 Homecoming Celebration.

Artist Statement for 1970:

I became an artist in the 1970s, and this sculpture is evocative of that time in many of its elements.

The stainless steel rods are welded together to form nine hendecagons, with an overall height and width of nearly 12 feet.  This 11-sided shape represents W&J’s position as the 11th oldest college in the nation.  Each of the interior eight “levels” of the stainless steel rod can be turned to form many other views, representing the changes so much a part of the era of the’70s.

The colorful spiral shapes within the hendecagon “grow” as the sculpture widens, representing the growth of the college. These brightly colored segments also represent an era when color was becoming dominant in art, architecture, design, etc.  Tie dye, color saturation, vibrancy…

The juxtaposition of the colors and the stainless steel suggest the combining of masculine and feminine elements to celebrate the beginning of co-education at Washington & Jefferson.

More information about Sculpture/Guy J. Bellaver and Washington & Jefferson College may be found on their web sites – http://bellaverstudios.com/ and http://washjeff.edu.

St. Vincent College and sculptor Guy J. Bellaver began a conversation about a sculpture commission for the Herman and Sis Dupré Science Pavilion as a result of Bellaver’s retrospective exhibition at the College entitled – The Creative Thread – From Fibonacci to Fermi.  Says Bellaver, “I have always been fascinated by the relationship of positive to negative space – the energy of their interaction, and my art.  In fact, the relationship of art to the STEM disciplines has informed my artwork since my first, extremely geometric stone sculptures.  I’m delighted to have been given the opportunity to develop this sculpture for St. Vincent.”

Bellaver expects to have the sculpture completed by March, 2013, so that it will be sited for the official dedication of the building.

“The Arts Together” – See a Short Video of the Installation

Guy J. Bellaver’s Sculpture “The Arts Together” Installed and Dedicated

August, 2012

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver’s bronze relief sculpture The Arts Together, commissioned by the Batavia High School Class of 1954, has been installed and dedicated at the Batavia (IL) Fine Arts Centre. Go to BellaverStudios.com for an image of the relief and a short video of the installation process.

Bellaver explains, “The Arts Together is a series of five bronze reliefs designed as five individual panels [to] represent Visual and Performing Arts (vocal music, dance, instrumental music, theater, and the visual arts) – yet each panel is designed to connect visually to the next panel.  This connection represents the function of the Fine Arts Centre – to “bring all the arts together under one roof” and connect Batavia’s students and the community at large to each other and to the arts.”

The sculpture was installed and dedicated in July, 2012.  Members of the Class of 1954 were joined by Dominic Cattero (Executive Director of the BFAC) and other interested individuals for the dedication.  Members of the class talked about the project and how art has impacted their lives, Bellaver explained the evolution of the sculpture’s creation, and Cattero accepted the sculpture on behalf of the BFAC.

The close-knit town of Batavia has embraced the Fine Arts Centre as a major addition to the community’s arts scene, following recent opening of venues such as Water Street Studios, an artists’ studio and gallery in downtown Batavia.

Sculpture/Guy J. Bellaver Is A “Verified” Veteran Owned Business

July, 2012

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver’s business, Sculpture, has received notification from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs that the business is a “Verified” Veteran Owned Business. To achieve this status, the business must go through a rigorous process, submitting detailed information about its history and present operations.

Bellaver has been a sculptor full time since 1975, and counts the Kane County Veterans Memorial among his major works of public art.  He was in the United States Army during the Vietnam War era, and was honorably discharged after his tour of duty, having attained the rank of Sergeant.

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver Receives Commission for Batavia Fine Arts Centre

May, 2012

Members of the Batavia High School Class of 1954 first met with Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver in the summer of 2011 to talk about creating a “class gift” that would be a special celebration of the newly completed expansion of Batavia High School.  After classmate James Hall proposed a matching funds challenge, the fundraising began and the Class of 1954 determined that they would fund a gift of original art to celebrate the newly built, state of the art high school auditorium.  The Class of 1954 wanted a beautiful and permanent work of art that would be a meaningful addition to both the high school expansion and the new Fine Arts Centre.  The close-knit town of Batavia has embraced the Fine Arts Centre as a major addition to the community’s arts scene, following recent opening of venues such as Water Street Studios, an artists’ studio and gallery in downtown Batavia.

To achieve the Class of 1954’s gift objectives, Mr. Bellaver created a series of five bronze reliefs entitled The Arts Together. The Artist’s Statement for the piece explains, “It is designed as five individual panels that represent Visual and Performing Arts (vocal music, dance, instrumental music, theater, and the visual arts) – yet each panel is designed to connect visually to the next panel.  This connection represents the function of the Fine Arts Centre – to “bring all the arts together under one roof” and connect Batavia’s students and the community at large to each other and to the arts.”

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver now Represented by Edgewood Orchard Galleries in Door County, WI

September, 2011

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver is now represented by Edgewood Orchard Galleries, Fish Creek, [Door County] Wisconsin.  Edgewood Orchard Galleries is one of the most respected art galleries in the Midwest, and is owned and operated by Nell and J.R. Jarosh.  Nell is the granddaughter of the gallery’s founder, Irene Haberland and through three generations, the gallery remains true to an eclectic spirit of adventure and beauty.  The gallery showcases a broad array of styles and media, and is currently presenting Bellaver’s abstract sculptures in stone and bronze. His work appears both inside the gallery and outside in the serene courtyard and the beautifully extensive Sculpture Garden.

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver Chosen to Participate in the St. Charles Arts Council’s “Art At Home” Fundraiser

August, 2011

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver was a participant in the recent “Art At Home” Event, hosted by Jeff and Cheri Hunt of St. Charles, as a fundraiser for the St. Charles Arts Council.  Jeff Hunt is the founder, director and conductor of the renowned St. Charles Singers, and Cheri Hunt is a visual artist.  Says Bellaver, “I think that I can speak for every visual artist and musician who has been involved in this program so far, when I say that the “Art At Home” program is an outstanding idea, and the support that the program will provide artists is significant.  I was honored that Cheri asked me to participate, and I couldn’t have designed a more fantastic setting for art – especially on a gorgeous summer night.”

The musicians who were featured in the Hunt “Art At Home” were the Mary Hunt Duo.  The Duo (Mary Hunt, vocals and Brandon Thies, guitar) covers a wide range of genres, such as jazz, blues and rock, striving to keep “live music” alive.  Most of Hunt’s stylings are taken from jazz and blues.  The visual artists who were featured included Bellaver, Joe Gangepain, Kathy Honey, Keith Kessner, Barbara McNamara, Howard Russo, Cloe Smith Westphall, Janet Wickham, and Phil Willman.

The “Art At Home” Program is an initiative of the St. Charles Arts Council intended to provide tangible support for artists, giving them opportunities to showcase and be compensated for their talent.  These events can include the work of performing artists, visual artists, culinary artists, etc.  The Arts Council encourages people to open up their homes to support the arts, and encourages artists to contact the SCAC to learn about showcase opportunities.  Contact the council at 630.443.3794 or StCharlesArtsCouncil@gmail.com.

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver Participates in the neXt gallery at Shelby

May, 2011

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver has been invited to participate in the neXt gallery – a Pop Up gallery program sponsored by the St. Charles Arts Council.  The gallery’s theme is Abstract/Primitive, and Bellaver’s sculptures Lissome, Quarks II, Quarks III, Quarks IV, and Percheron.Q are in the show and sale.  Says Bellaver, “I think that I can speak for every artist involved in this program when I say that this [Pop Up gallery] is an outstanding idea, and the support that the program will provide artists is significant.  And, I think that I can safely add to that how impressive the space is, and the curating [by guest curator Monique Meloche] has taken a broad assortment of artistic styles and media and made a very impressive show.”

Bellaver will also be one of the artists giving an Artist Demonstration at the gallery on Friday, June 17 from 4 to 6 p.m. and on Saturday, June 18 from 2 to 5 p.m.  He will demonstrate how he combines 21st century tools like the iMac, with ancient tools and knives to sculpt in clay.

The neXt gallery at Shelby is located in the Shelby Building, 210 South Fifth Street, Suite 100, St. Charles, Illinois.  Information about the gallery, the artists participating in the gallery, its hours of operation, and special events taking place during the month that the gallery is in the Shelby space, may be found at the gallery web site, www.nextgallerystcharles.org.  Or you may call the gallery at 630.429.0973.

“Prairie Song.Q”, Part of the CSI Exhibit at Art Chicago, Appears on ABC7 News Site

April, 2011

The April 7th broadcast of ABC7 news featured some of the sculptures in the CSI Exhibition at Art Chicago.  Guy J. Bellaver’s “Prairie Song.Q” was prominently featured on the broadcast, and remains as the image for the story on ABC7′s web site.  Paste this link in your web browser to see “Prairie Song.Q”:

http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=news/local&id=8063261

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver Announces his 2011 Exhibition Schedule

April, 2011

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver has been selected to show his work this year in a number of exhibitions throughout the Midwest, which include short term shows such as Art Chicago, and year round exhibitions, such as Edina Promenade.  His schedule includes:

CSI – Art Chicago (outside Merchandise Mart)   Chicago, IL       April 2 – May 2, 2011

CSI – Art Chicago (inside Merchandise Mart)      Chicago, IL      April 29 – May 2, 2011

Sculpture in the Park – Mt. St. Mary’s Park         St. Charles, IL  April 21 – Oct. 10, 2011

SculptureTour Salina                                                   Salina, KS         May 6, 2011 – April, 2012

Edina Promenade                                                          Edina, MN       May 31, 2011 – May 1, 2012

Sculpture/Guy J. Bellaver A Finalist in the Blue Springs, MO Sculpture Competition

January, 2011

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver was recently named a Finalist in the Sixth Annual Temporary Exhibit Competition of the City of Blue Springs, Missouri.  The Exhibit is issued by the Blue Spring Public Art Commission, and is entitled “Inspired Visions”.  The Public Art Commission is working in cooperation with RED Development, developers of Adams Dairy Landing. An Artist Selection Panel composed of artists, art administrators, a representative from RED Development, the Planning Commission, and community residents, was convened to review all submissions meeting the application requirements and deadline.  Artists were selected on the basis of submission materials evidencing artistic quality of past work and experiences. One or more of the pieces in the exhibit may be purchased annually to remain in the city as permanent art.  The City attempts to select and acquire art when possible for the City’s collection.

Guy J. Bellaver’s One Man Show at St. Vincent College – “The Creative Thread – From Fibonacci to Fermi”

October, 2010

Mr. Bellaver recently presented an exhibition of his current sculptures, and a retrospective of his work, at St. Vincent College in Latrobe, Pennsylvania.  Don Orlando, Director of Public Relations at St. Vincent writes, “Mr. Bellaver’s artistic creations…were chosen for this exhibit to coincide with the inauguration of Br. Norman…and the construction of the new Sis and Herman Dupre Science Pavilion.”

Mr. Bellaver says of this retrospective exhibition, “After almost four decades as an artist, my work remains very organic, but a bit less about shapes and more about energy…I am currently working on a series entitled Quarks. These pieces explore mass that is exploding and creating disintegrating arcs – the bronze or fiberglass segments represent mass, and the rods represent that mass leaving one area, and exploding into another. The inspiration for Quarks is the work done at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, a proton-antiproton collider in the neighboring community of Batavia, Illinois. They investigate High-Energy Physics, the science of matter, space and time. I have always been fascinated by the relationship of positive to negative space – the energy of their interaction, and my art. In fact, the relationship of art to the STEM disciplines has informed my artwork since those first, extremely geometric stone sculptures.”

A slideshow of photos from the Exhibit at St. Vincent College is available for viewing at http://www.stvincent.edu/static/slideshow_10.html#id=sep16bellaver&num=1

Sculpture/Guy J. Bellaver Approved as a Veteran Owned Small Business

August, 2010

Sculptor Guy J. Bellaver’s business, Sculpture, has been approved as a Veteran Owned Small Business.

Mr. Bellaver was in the United States Army during the Vietnam War era, and was honorably discharged after his tour of duty, having attained the rank of Sergeant.

Guy Bellaver a Finalist for the Avera McKennan Hospital Icon Sculpture

April, 2010

Guy J. Bellaver was recently named a finalist in Avera McKennan Hospital’s Open Competition for an Icon Sculpture for their main Hospital Campus in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Recent Exhibition Record

Vicinity Show

Norris Cultural Arts Center

St. Charles, IL

Sculpture in the Park

Mt. St. Mary’s Park

St. Charles, IL

Gallery Show, Bridges Fine Art Gallery

Hotel Baker

St. Charles, IL

Art in the Abstract (5 artists)

Fermilab Art Gallery

Batavia, IL

Aurora Art Walk (7 artists)

Downtown Venues

Aurora, IL

Positive Matters (w/ Derek Hambly)

Monroe Cultural Arts Center

Monroe, WI

Turchin Center for the Arts’ Rosen Sculpture Competition

Appalachian State U/Downtown

Boone, NC

SculptureWalk

Downtown Venues

Sioux Falls, SD

SculptureWalk

Washington Pavilion

Sioux Falls, SD

SculptureWalk

Avera McKennan Hospital

Sioux Falls, SD

Sculpture in the Park

Benson Sculpture Garden

Loveland, CO

The Creative Thread – From Fibonacci to Fermi (1 man show)

The St. Vincent Gallery

Latrobe, PA